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Physical Education (PE): Curriculum Project Team

Phase I of the current Physical Education curriculum was adopted by the School Board on May 20, 2019.  The adoption process followed the procedures outlined in the Instructional Materials Selection Administrative Regulation II/IIA-AR.

Students doing handstands
Student playing soccer

Physical Education Curriculum Project Team Materials

Best Practices in Physical Education Instruction

The Physical Education Best Practice document summarizes the research-based strategies for instruction in physical skills (psychomotor), fitness and movement concepts (cognitive), and personal/social skills (affective). The following document is divided into two sections to provide specific guidance appropriate to each developmental level: Elementary Physical Education and Secondary Physical Education.

Guiding Principles for K-12 Physical Education:
  1. Highly qualified Physical Education teachers.

  2. Planned, sequential, and locally adopted and implemented curriculum aligned with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) Physical Education standards aligned with the Society of Health and Physical Educators (SHAPE) standards.

  3. Class sizes consistent with other subject areas.

  4. Access to safe indoor and outdoor facilities designed for Physical Education instruction.

  5. Access to developmentally appropriate, maintained equipment, as well as technology and supplies for Physical Education instruction.

  6. Developmentally appropriate length of class time and frequency throughout the week

  7. Assessment that informs instruction.

Physical Education - 5D Categories with SHAPE Best Practices

A quality Physical Education curriculum is aligned with ODE Physical Education standards which are based on SHAPE standards. To assist our students in becoming physically literate, we must promote and implement a foundational learning model in which they will develop, practice, and personalize essential physical, social, and cognitive skills.

Elementary Physical Education (K-5)

Purpose

The purpose of Physical Education is to develop physically literate individuals who have the knowledge, skills, and confidence to participate and enjoy a lifetime of physical activity. "Physical literacy is the motivation, confidence, physical competence, knowledge, and understanding to value and take responsibility for engagement in physical activities for life." - The International Physical Literacy Association (2017).

Instructional Best Practices:
  • Developing students’ fundamental motor and manipulative skills and applying them to a variety of settings.
  • Clear goals and objectives for student learning and performance are communicated to students.
  • Health-related components of fitness are the focus of fitness activities. Skill-related components of fitness are emphasized in their relation to skill development.
  • Help students understand that physical activity is an important part of everyday living.
  • Activities are designed to allow students opportunities to work together, for the purpose of developing social skills (cooperative, competitive, and sportsmanship) and learning responsible behavior.

Student Engagement

Engagement is strongest in Physical Education when students are given the opportunity for maximum participation in a variety of developmentally appropriate physical activities. Engagement is evident when a positive and safe classroom environment has been established and where activities are differentiated so that all students experience success and growth.

Instructional Best Practices:
  • Programs are designed to guide students to take responsibility for their own behavior and learning. Emphasis is on intrinsic, rather than extrinsic, incentives.
  • The teacher extends experiences from in-class activity lessons to community and family activities, promoting a physically active lifestyle.
  • Teachers will differentiate activities and accommodate students’ preference for varying levels of competition.
  • Teachers promote exercise for its contribution to a healthy lifestyle. Students are encouraged to participate in physical activity and exercise outside of the Physical Education setting for enjoyment, skill development, and building a healthy lifestyle.
  • Teachers adapt their lessons for different classes within and between grade levels.
  • Teachers encourage all students to experience the satisfaction and joy that can result from learning about and participating regularly in physical activity.
  • Teachers help students understand that physical activity is an important part of everyday living (e.g., climbing stairs instead of using an elevator; riding a bike or walking to school).
  • Teachers develop learning experiences that help students understand the nature of and the different kinds of competition.
  • The teacher plans for skill and concept instruction and provides adequate time for practice, skill development and feedback based on appropriate skill analysis.
  • All students have equal opportunities to participate and interact with the teacher (e.g., leadership, playing “skilled” positions, teacher feedback).
  • All students, regardless of developmental level and ability, are challenged at an appropriate level.
  • Teachers provide appropriate experiences for students with temporary medical limitations.

Curriculum and Pedagogy

The curriculum is based on district adopted learning targets from ODE Physical Education standards aligned with SHAPE standards with content that is relevant and developmentally appropriate to students. The curriculum provides opportunities for teachers to modify and adjust instruction to meet the individual needs of students.

Instructional Best Practices:
  • The Physical Education curriculum has a clear scope and sequence based on goals and objectives that are appropriate for all students and that are derived from ODE Physical Education Standards aligned with SHAPE Standards.
  • The teacher focuses on developing students’ fundamental motor and manipulative skills and applying them to a variety of settings.
  • Strategies, tactics, exercise science, peer/self feedback and fitness concepts are included throughout the curriculum.
  • Clear goals and objectives for student learning and performance are communicated to students, parents/guardians and administrators.
  • Teachers form pairs, groups and teams in ways that preserve every student’s dignity and self- respect.
  • Physical Education classes begin with an instant activity, anticipatory set, physical warm-up and/or fitness related activity; proceed to the instructional focus; and close with a physiological cool-down and a review of instructional objectives.
  • Stretching, if included in the lesson, occurs only after an appropriate general warm up activity and is appropriate and beneficial for maintaining and improving flexibility.
  • The teacher plans for skill and concept instruction and provides adequate time for practice, skill development, and feedback based on appropriate skill analysis.
  • Each lesson is designed to meet program goals as stated in a published scope and sequence.
  • Teachers adapt their lessons for different classes within and between grade levels.
  • Rhythmical activities & dance: The teacher includes a variety of rhythmical, expressive, creative and culturally enriching dance experiences designed with the student’s physical, cultural, emotional and social abilities in mind.
  • Teachers link Physical Education experiences with concepts being taught in mathematics, reading, science, social studies, art and music when appropriate.
  • Games instruction: Teachers select, design, sequence and modify games to maximize specific learning, fitness/skill enhancement and enjoyment.
  • Activities are selected carefully to ensure that they match students’ ability levels and are safe for all students, regardless of ability level.
  • Students are encouraged to undertake appropriate levels of activity for their own improvement.
  • Teachers intentionally select activities that represent a culturally diverse environment (e.g., dances and games from around the world).
  • Lessons are planned to revisit skills and concepts throughout the year and from year to year, to allow for student growth and readiness.
  • Teachers organize their classes to maximize opportunities for all students to learn and be physically active. Enough equipment is provided so that students spend virtually no time waiting for turns or standing in lines.

Assessment for Student Learning

Student assessment is aligned with district adopted learning targets and includes all three learning domains (psychomotor, cognitive, and affective). Assessments are ongoing and conducted both formatively and summatively. Formative and summative assessments are used to guide instruction, allowing the teacher to adjust instruction as necessary based on assessment outcomes. Through formative assessments, teachers are able to make in the moment adjustments within the lesson to allow students to achieve success.

Instructional Best Practices:
  • Physical Education grades are based on thoughtfully identified components that are aligned with course goals and ODE Physical Education standards aligned with SHAPE standards.
  • Formative and summative assessments constitute ongoing and integral parts of the learning process for all students, including those with disabilities.
  • Teachers systematically teach and assess all domains (cognitive, affective and psychomotor), using a variety of assessment techniques.
  • Assessments include clearly defined criteria that are articulated to students as part of instruction before the assessment (e.g., a rubric is provided and explained during instruction).
  • Teachers use fitness assessment as part of the ongoing process of helping students understand, enjoy, improve and/or maintain their physical fitness and well-being (e.g., students set goals for improvement that are revisited during the school year).
  • As part of an ongoing program of Physical Education, students are physically prepared in each fitness component so that they can complete the assessments safely.
  • Teachers make every effort to create assessment situations that are private, non-threatening, educational and encouraging (e.g., they explain what the test is designed to measure).
  • Teachers encourage children students to avoid comparisons with others and, instead, use the results as a catalyst for personal improvement.
  • The teacher helps students interpret and use assessment data to set goals and develop a fitness plan.
  • Assessment results are shared privately with children students and their parents/guardians as a tool for developing personal goals and strategies for maintaining and increasing the respective fitness parameters.
  • The teacher provides regular reports of student progress to students and parents/guardians using a variety of continuous formative evaluations and assessments (e.g., heart rate monitor printouts, pedometer step sheets).
  • Students know the components of and criteria included in their grade, and the rationale for each.
  • Data on student achievement is used to evaluate program effectiveness on a regular basis.

Classroom Environment and Culture

Teachers create a learning environment in which all students feel safe to take risks and build competence and confidence while performing various physical skills and participating in various physical activities. A nurturing Physical Education environment values and respects all students regardless of ability level, facilitating student choice and independent learning.

Instructional Best Practices:
  • Teacher systematically plans for, develops, and maintains a positive learning environment that maximizes learning and participation, in an atmosphere of respect and support from the teacher and the child’s student’s peers.
  • Teachers promote exercise for its contribution to a healthy lifestyle. Children Students are encouraged to participate in physical activity and exercise outside of the Physical Education setting for enjoyment, skill development and health reasons.
  • Environment is supportive of all students and promotes developing a positive self-concept. Children are allowed to try, to fail, and to try again, free of criticism or harassment from the teacher or other students.
  • Children are encouraged to avoid comparisons with others and, instead, use the results as a catalyst for personal improvement.
  • Fair and consistent classroom-management practices encourage student responsibility for positive behavior.
  • Bullying, taunting and inappropriate student remarks and behaviors are dealt with immediately and firmly.
  • Teachers form pairs, groups and teams in ways that preserve every child’s dignity and self- respect.
  • Teachers make every effort possible to create a safe learning environment for students.
  • Emergency action plans are posted and practiced.
  • Physical Education class size is consistent with those of other subject areas.
  • Teachers create an environment that is inclusive and supportive of all children, regardless of race, ethnic origin, gender, sexual orientation, religion or physical ability. Such differences are acknowledged, appreciated and respected.
  • Teachers intentionally select activities that represent a culturally diverse environment (e.g., dances and games from around the world).
  • Teachers use gender-neutral language (e.g., “students”).
  • Students are encouraged, supported and socialized toward successful achievement in all content taught in Physical Education (e.g., dance is for everyone).
  • Teachers organize their classes to maximize opportunities for all children to learn and be physically active.
  • Enough equipment is provided so that children spend virtually no time waiting for turns or standing in lines. At least half of class time is spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

Professional Collaboration and Communication

The Physical Educator conducts themselves in a professional manner and seeks opportunities to improve their teaching practices through professional development and collaboration.

Instructional Best Practices:
  • Maintain up-to-date first aid, Automated External Defibrillator (AED) and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) certifications.
  • The teacher continually seeks new information to stay current (e.g., reads journals, attends conferences and in-services)
  • The teacher is the physical activity expert in the school.
  • The teacher informs parents/ guardians, administrators and the public regularly about the Physical Education program’s goals and activities.
  • The teacher helps create a school culture of physical activity.
  • Clear goals and objectives for student learning and performance are communicated to students, parents/guardians and administrators.
  • Implement the special education process for students with disabilities as outlined in students’ individualized education plan, 504 plan and/or the school’s accommodations.
  • Teachers frequently link Physical Education experiences with concepts being taught in mathematics, reading, science, social studies, art and music.
  • Teachers maintain up-to-date first aid, AED and CPR certifications.
  • Teachers implement the special education process for students with disabilities as outlined in students’ individualized education programs and/ or the school’s accommodations.
  • Teachers may assist in planning school based events with the help of the school community (e.g., Fun Runs, Field Days, Family Fitness Nights etc.) so that every child participates fully and derives satisfaction and joy from a festival of physical activity linked to the Physical Education program.
  • Physical Education teacher follows the guidelines of the District Wellness Policy.
  • Physical activity “brain boosts” will be provided to ensure students receive 150 minutes of physical activity when combined with Physical Education minutes a week.

Secondary Physical Education (6-12)

Purpose

The purpose of Physical Education is to develop physically literate individuals who have the knowledge, skills, and confidence to participate and enjoy a lifetime of physical activity. "Physical literacy is the motivation, confidence, physical competence, knowledge, and understanding to value and take responsibility for engagement in physical activities for life." - The International Physical Literacy Association (2017).

Instructional Best Practices:
  • Clear goals and objectives for student learning and performance are communicated to students, parents/guardians and administrators.
  • The Physical Educator includes activities that are developmentally appropriate including motor skill development, physiological and biomechanical concepts, and health-enhancing physical activities that lead to an active lifestyle, and opportunities to develop appropriate social behaviors.
  • Students are educated to become wise consumers of the fitness/wellness and nutrition industries.
  • The health-related components of fitness are the focus of fitness activities. Skill-related components of fitness are emphasized in their relation to skill development.
  • Teacher intentionally designs activities throughout the program that provide students with opportunities to work together, for the purpose of developing social skills (cooperative and competitive) and learning responsible behavior.
  • Help students understand that physical activity is an important part of everyday living.

Student Engagement

Instructional Best Practices:
  • Systematically plans for, develops and maintains a positive learning environment that allows students to feel safe (physically and emotionally).
  • Are designed to guide students to take responsibility for their own behavior and learning. Emphasis is on intrinsic, rather than extrinsic, incentives.
  • Promotes exercise for its contribution to a healthy lifestyle. Students are encouraged to participate in physical activity and exercise outside of the Physical Education setting for enjoyment, skill development and health reasons.
  • Students have equal opportunities to participate and interact with the teacher. All students, regardless of developmental level and ability, are challenged at an appropriate level.
  • Lessons/activities are adapted for students at all fitness levels.
  • Provides appropriate experiences for students with temporary medical limitations.
  • Teachers will differentiate activities and accommodate students’ preference for varying levels of competition.
  • Students are guided to understand that some peers may or may not prefer competitive situations, and either preference is acceptable.
  • Plans for skill and concept instruction and provides adequate time for practice, skill development and feedback based on appropriate skill analysis.
  • Design progressions that allow students to build on previously learned content and skills by focusing on lifetime activities.
  • Students are educated to become wise consumers of the fitness, wellness, and nutrition industries.
  • Extends experiences from in-class activity lessons to community and family activities, promoting a physically active lifestyle.
  • Helps all students experience the satisfaction and joy of learning about and participating regularly in physical activity.
  • Helps students understand that physical activity is an important part of everyday living.
  • All middle school students shall receive Physical Education as mandated by Oregon state law.
  • All high school students will complete credits for Physical Education, no waivers are given.
  • Teachers find ways to encourage student talk by self and peer evaluation without taking away from activity time.

Curriculum and Pedagogy

The curriculum is based on district adopted learning targets from ODE Physical Education standards aligned with SHAPE standards with content that is relevant and developmentally appropriate to students. The curriculum provides opportunities for teachers to modify and adjust instruction to meet the individual needs of students.

Instructional Best Practices:
  • Curriculum has an obvious scope and sequence based on goals and objectives that are appropriate for all students and that are derived from ODE Physical Education standards aligned with SHAPE standards.
  • Activities are developmentally appropriate for early-adolescent students and are aimed at promoting success for all students.
  • Strategies, tactics, exercise science, biomechanical analysis and fitness concepts are included throughout the curriculum.
  • Clear goals and objectives for student learning and performance are communicated to students, parents/ guardians and administrators. Students are held accountable for those expectations through various strategies.
  • Form pairs, groups and teams in ways that preserve every student’s dignity and self-respect.
  • Classes begin with an instant activity, anticipatory set and physical warm-up; proceed to the instructional focus and fitness activities; and close with a physiological cool-down and a review of instructional objectives.
  • Stretching occurs only after an appropriate general warm-up activity and is appropriate and beneficial for maintaining and improving flexibility.
  • Plans for skill and concept instruction and provides adequate time for practice, skill development and feedback based on appropriate skill analysis.
  • Each lesson is designed to meet program goals as stated in a published scope and sequence.
  • Design progressions that allow students to build on previously learned content and skills by focusing on lifetime activities.
  • Students are guided to understand that some students prefer competitive situations, while others don’t; and either preference is acceptable.
  • Physical Education is part of a multidisciplinary curriculum, but integration doesn’t compromise teaching the concepts important to developing a physically educated individual.
  • Activities are selected carefully to ensure that they match students’ ability levels and are safe for all students, regardless of ability level.
  • Lessons/activities are adapted for students at all fitness levels. Students are encouraged to complete appropriate levels of activity for their own improvement.
  • Intentionally select activities that represent a culturally diverse environment.
  • Offers a variety of units of sufficient length, appropriate for all students, that revisit skills and concepts learned previously.
  • Students have equal opportunities to participate and interact with the teacher.
  • Teachers organize their classes to maximize opportunities for all students to learn and be physically active. Enough equipment is provided so that students spend virtually no time waiting for turns or standing in lines. At least half of class time is spent in moderate-to-vigorous activity.
  • Teachers promote student talk to check for understanding, provide feedback, and affirm effort.

Assessment for Student Learning

Student assessment is aligned with district adopted learning targets and includes all three learning domains (psychomotor, cognitive, and affective). Assessments are ongoing and conducted both formatively and summatively. Formative and summative assessments are used to guide instruction, allowing the teacher to adjust instruction as necessary based on assessment outcomes. Through formative assessments, teachers are able to make in the moment adjustments within the lesson to allow students to achieve success.

Instructional Best Practices:
  • Physical Education grades are based on thoughtfully identified components that are aligned with course goals and ODE Physical Education standards aligned with SHAPE standards.
  • Formative and summative assessments constitute ongoing and integral parts of the learning process for all students, including those with disabilities.
  • Systematically teach and assess all domains (cognitive, affective and psychomotor), using a variety of assessment techniques.
  • Assessments include clearly defined criteria that are articulated to students as part of instruction before the assessment.
  • Fitness assessments are part of the ongoing process of helping students understand, enjoy, improve and/or maintain their physical fitness and well-being (e.g., students set goals for improvement that are revisited during the school year).
  • As part of an ongoing program of Physical Education, students are prepared physically in each fitness component so that they can complete the assessments safely.
  • Make every effort to create assessment situations that are private confidential, non-threatening, educational and encouraging.
  • Encourage students to avoid comparisons with others and, instead, to use the results as a catalyst for personal improvement.
  • Assists students to interpret and use fitness assessment data to set goals and develop a lifelong fitness plan.
  • Assessment results are shared privately with students and their parents/guardians as a tool for developing personal goals and strategies
  • Provide regular reports of student progress to students and parents/guardians, using a variety of continuous, formative evaluations and assessments.
  • Students know the components of and criteria included in their grade, and the rationale for each.
  • Data on student achievement are used to evaluate program effectiveness on a regular basis.

Classroom Environment and Culture

Teachers create a learning environment in which all students feel safe to take risks and build competence and confidence while performing various physical skills and participating in various physical activities. A nurturing Physical Education environment values and respects all students regardless of ability level, facilitating student choice and independent learning.

Instructional Best Practices:
  • Systematically plans for, develops and maintains a positive learning environment that allows students to feel safe (physically and emotionally), supported and unafraid to make mistakes.
  • Environment is supportive of all students and promotes developing a positive self-concept. Students are allowed to try, to fail, and to try again, free of criticism or harassment from the teacher or other students.
  • Fair and consistent classroom-management practices encourage student responsibility for positive behavior. Students are included in the process of developing class rules/agreements.
  • Bullying and inappropriate student remarks and behaviors are dealt with immediately and firmly.
  • Encourage students to avoid comparisons with others and, instead, to use the results as a catalyst for personal improvement.
  • Test results are shared privately with students and their parents/ guardians as a tool for developing personal goals and strategies for maintaining and increasing the respective fitness parameters.
  • Form pairs, groups and teams in ways that preserve every student’s dignity and self-respect.
  • Promote exercise for its contribution to a healthy lifestyle. Students are encouraged to participate in physical activity and exercise outside of the Physical Education setting for enjoyment, skill development and health reasons.
  • Make every effort possible to create a safe learning environment for students.
  • Emergency action plans are posted and practiced.
  • Physical Education class size is consistent with those of other subject areas.
  • Ensure student safety by monitoring class closely.
  • Create an environment that is inclusive and supportive of all students, regardless of race, ethnic origin, gender, sexual orientation, religion or physical ability. Such differences are acknowledged, appreciated and respected.
  • Intentionally select activities that represent a culturally diverse environment.
  • All students are encouraged, supported and socialized toward successful achievement in all content taught in Physical Education.
  • Use gender-neutral language.
  • Organize their classes to maximize opportunities for all students to learn and be physically active.
  • Teachers promote social skills through modeling appropriate behaviors

Professional Collaboration and Communication

The Physical Educator conducts themselves in a professional manner and seeks opportunities to improve their teaching practices through professional development and collaboration.

Instructional Best Practices:
  • Maintain up-to-date first aid, AED and CPR certifications.
  • Implement the special education process for students with disabilities as outlined in students’ individualized education plan, 504 plan and/or the school’s accommodations.
  • Objectives for student learning and performance are communicated to students, parents/ guardians and administrators. Students are held accountable for those expectations through various strategies.
  • Physical Education is part of a multidisciplinary curriculum, but integration doesn’t compromise teaching the concepts important to developing a physically educated individual.
  • Regularly engage in professional development designed for the Physical Education teacher.
  • Physical Education teacher is the expert of physical activity in the school.
  • Physical Education teacher follows the guidelines of the District Wellness Policy.
  • Informs parents/guardians, administrators, policymakers and the public regularly about the Physical Education program’s goals and activities.
  • Fosters a school culture of physical activity and healthy living.
  • Physical activity “brain boosts” will be provided in other content area classrooms when needed.

 

Physical Education Project Team Report

If you need an accessible version of this report, please call 503.356.4328

BSD Physical Education Learning Targets

Instructional Resources

Instructional Resources

Elementary

Grade K-5 Instructional Resources

The Physical Education Curriculum Project Team will be recommending Instructional Resources during Phase II.

Middle School

Middle School Instructional Resources

The Physical Education Curriculum Project Team will be recommending Instructional Resources during Phase II.

High School

The Physical Education Curriculum Project Team will be recommending Instructional Resources during Phase II.