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Standards-Based Learning System (SBLS)

A standards-based learning system is built around several powerful ideas:

  • All classroom instruction and assessments are aligned to BSD Learning Targets

  • Multiple opportunities are provided for students to demonstrate growth and learning

  • Formative assessment practices provide feedback focused on student growth and support improved instruction

  • Consistent scoring guides (rubrics)  determine a student's level of learning and indicate what a student must do to improve

  • Regular reporting of progress on each learning target occurs

  • Academics and behaviors are reported separately

  • The highest value is placed on teacher judgment and expertise

SBLS

The Nine Components of the BSD Standards Based Learning System

The Nine Components of the BSD Standards Based Learning System

1. Clear Learning Targets for Students:  A proficiency-based assessment model provides students with clear and objective learning targets - this takes the mystery out of assessment for students.

2. Assessments Linked to Learning Targets:  A Collection of Evidence within a proficiency-based model asks teachers to examine how their classroom assessments measure student learning on the Learning Targets. This allows teachers the opportunity to reflect on the assessments in their classrooms and participate in professional collaboration with colleagues (PLC's) as they examine student work together and refine their assessment practices. This collaboration is done both horizontally (within grade levels) and vertically (across grade levels).

3. Multiple Opportunities to Demonstrate Proficiency:  A proficiency-based assessment model utilizes multiple assessments (aligned with Learning Targets) within a Collection of Evidence to award a holistic evaluation (or summary judgment). Additionally, the evidence within the Collection of Evidence may look different from student to student, which addresses the need for equity through diversity in assessment.

4. Flexibility for Individual Learners:  Proficiency-based assessment allows students to meet proficiencies at any time beyond a single test date or an individual work sample. Because the model uses a Collection of Evidence to measure student growth, learners can meet proficiencies at their own pace.

 

5. Valuing of Teacher Judgment and Expertise:  A proficiency-based assessment model is internally teacher-driven. Classroom teachers decide what assessments will be part of a Collection of Evidence based on sufficiency guidelines. Additionally, teachers score the collections internally rather than sending them out of a school to be scored externally. When research-based criteria are applied to this process, the summary judgments of teachers have been found to be more comprehensive than standardized testing, just as reliable, and far more conducive to student learning.

6. Equity and Consistency Across the District:  While a proficiency-based assessment model is internally teacher driven, it is also externally moderated to insure accuracy and consistency across a school and district. Teachers moderate their individual scoring against a common set of sufficiency and proficiency criteria to insure equivalent and/or equitable instruction and evaluation across classrooms and schools.

7. Balance Between Formative and Summative Assessment:  A proficiency-based model supports the use of formative classroom assessments to inform instruction and monitor student learning and interim assessments for key checkpoints. These assessments, which are part of a collection of evidence, are the primary guides to classroom instruction and planning. Large-scale testing summative assessments are then used as appropriate: for system-wide data to guide policy level decision-making.

8. Clear Communication about Student Learning:  A proficiency-based assessment model allows student learning on grade level Learning Targets to be reported on a continuum from novice to expert within a year and across years in skill development areas (reading, writing, etc.). This provides clear and specific individual student growth information within the system (teachers, students, parents and between levels) as well as outside the system (i.e. District, School Board, etc).

9. Opportunities for Student Involved Assessment:  With a proficiency-based model, students are the primary users of assessment information. They have clear Learning Targets, understand the purpose of assessments that link to Learning Targets, have multiple opportunities to meet the targets in a variety of ways, track their progress in meeting targets, and can clearly communicate this progress.

Why a Standards Based Learning System

Why is it important to have classroom instruction and student tasks / assignments aligned to clear learning targets?

"The concept of 'Opportunity to Learn', then, is a simple but powerful one – if students do not have the opportunity to learn the content expected of them, there is little chance that they will.  'Opportunity to Learn' address the extent to which the curriculum in a school is 'guaranteed.'  This means that state and districts give clear guidance to teachers regarding the content to be addressed in specific courses and at specific grade levels."  "Opportunity to Learn has the strongest relationship with student achievement of all school-level factors identified in Marzano (2000a)." – What Works in Schools by Robert J. Marzano

"But to bring about significant improvement in education, we must link standards to what takes place in classrooms.  For that to happen, teachers need to do two important things: (1) translate the standards into specific classroom experiences that facilitate student learning and (2) ensure the classroom assessments effectively measure the learning." – Mapping the Road to Proficiency by Thomas R. Guskey

Why is it important for students to have multiple opportunities to demonstrate their achievement on each learning target?

"The straight answer to the question of, 'What happens if a student doesn't meet the standards?' is that the student does the assignment again or has additional opportunities in other contexts to meet the standards.  Indeed, revision and improvement is one of the distinguishing features of a standards-based performance assessment.  It is not a 'one-shot' ordeal.  To people who regard such advice as unworkable and extraordinary, I would recommend a few hours with the typical music or physical education teacher.  When a student clarinetist squeaks through the B-flat scale, the typical response is neither a note home nor a low grade awarded many weeks later.  Rather, the student plays the B-flat scale again – and again, and again, until he gets it right.  Effective coaches and physical education teachers routinely do the same thing, knowing that skills in that subject are acquired with practice.  Thus when I ask teachers to give students multiple opportunities for success and when I insist that the consequences of poor performance should not be a low grade but rather the requirement for more work, I am only asking them to take reading, math, social studies, and science just as seriously as they take music and physical education." – Making Standards Work by Douglas B. Reeves   

"Giving students the opportunity to master a skill over time and with repeated attempts may change their ideas about how and why they succeed in class.  If we offer our students the opportunity to try again and really work with them to achieve, perhaps their perceptions of the causes of achievement can change from an innate ability to perform to persistence and effort." – Engaging Adolescents in Reading by J. Guthrie\

Why are formative practices (tasks designed to provide feedback and encourage growth) so important?

"The reported impact of feedback in achievement ranges from a low of 21 percentile points to a high of 41.  Both of these indicate that academic achievement in classes where effective feedback is provided to students is considerably higher than the achievement in classes where it is not.  In fact, a review of almost 8,000 studies led John Hattie (1992) to comment, "The most powerful single modification that embraces achievement is feedback.  The simplest prescription for improving education must be 'dollops of feedback.'"

"The research shows conclusively that formative assessment does improve learning.  The gains in achievement appear to be quite considerable, and as noted earlier; amongst the largest ever reported for educational interventions.  As an illustration of just how big these gains are, an effect size of 0.7, if it could be achieved on a nationwide scale, would be equivalent to raising the mathematics achievement score of an 'average' country like England, New Zealand or the United States into the 'top five' after the Pacific rim countries of Singapore, Korea, Japan, and Hong Kong." – In the Black Box by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.

Why is the use of scoring guides / rubrics so important?

"The manner in which students receive feedback is important for student achievement.  As discussed previously, criterion-referenced feedback is superior to norm-referenced feedback.  In nontechnical terms, this means that providing students with feedback in terms of specific levels of knowledge and skill is better than simply providing students with a percentage score.  One powerful set of tools to this end is rubrics." – Classroom Instruction that Works by Robert J. Marzano, Debra J. Pickering, and Jane E. Pollock

"Rubrics hold a mirror up to your objectives for an assessment task.  Matt Townsley (high school math teacher) remembers well the day he looked into this mirror and didn't like what he saw.  'I realized my criteria were mostly about how neat the project looked.  It hit me that students could do well without knowing a whole lot about the learning objective.'" – How We Got Grading Wrong, and What to Do About It by Laura Varlas

Why is the reporting of student progress on learning targets so important?

"Effective feedback is specific and formative in nature.  Certainly feedback once a year from a state test or standardized test falls well below the minimum frequency level.  At a minimum, students should receive quarterly feedback on their academic performance.  Consequently, schools must establish a system that provides feedback on specific knowledge and skills at least every nine weeks.  This automatically rules out state-developed tests on standards, off-the-shelf standardized test, or even both working in tandem.  For all practical purposes, a school has two primary options.

The first is to construct a series of quarterly tests that are specifically designed to assess student competence in essential school-identified content.  Although this is a viable option, it is usually an expensive one because most schools and districts do not have the time or resident expertise to construct such test and must rely on companies that specialize in their design.

A second and much better option is to redesign report cards and grading practices to reflect student competence in specific or 'essential' knowledge and skills." - What Works in Schools by Robert J. Marzano

"Thoughtful and well-informed initiatives to develop new reporting forms frequently prompt discussions about other elements of schooling, which can be vitally important to students' success.  When educators begin talking about what to report and how to report it, they also begin thinking about clarity of state or district learning standards, the effectiveness of their instructional strategies, and the quality of their classroom assessments.  In addition, they often become more conscientious about helping student learn well, earn high grades or marks, and gain confidence in learning situations." – Developing Standards-Based Report Cards by Thomas R. Guskey and Jane M. Bailey 

 

The History of Standards-Based Learning in the Beaverton School District

2004-2005:
  • The School Board challenges middle schools to become more rigorous and schools ask the question, "What is the standard(s) we expect?"
2005-2006:
  • Middle schools begin investigating​ best practices
2006-2007:
  • Middle schools agree on several reform efforts, including Learning Targets and Best Practices in Assessment

2007-2008:

  • Standards-based professional development for teachers begins
  • Middle school teachers begin developing school specific learning targets

2008-2009:

  • Middle school teachers establish teams to develop consistent learning targets and rubrics
  • Middle school teachers begin moderating collections of student work around learning targets

2009-2010:

  • Middle schools ask the School Board to support efforts to establish a standards-based system
  • School Board establishes the K-12 Grading & Reporting Project Team
  • The Grading & Reporting Project Team investigates current practices
  • Middle schools begin reporting student achievement on learning targets
  • Nike begins supporting the implementation of standards-based practices at both the elementary and middle levels through the Nike School Innovation Fund (NSIF)

2010-2011:

  • School Board approves Policy IK recommendations from the Grading & Reporting Project Team
  • K-5 and 6-12 teacher teams work to refine, align and create learning targets and rubrics
  • Middle school teachers continue moderating student collections of evidence around learning targets

2011-2012:

  • K-5 and 6-12 teacher teams continue work to refine, align and create learning targets and rubrics
  • Teaching & Learning and Information & Technology Departments begin working with EduPoint to refine the TeacherVue electronic grade book
  • The Report Card Design Team is formed
  • Community forums begin
  • Middle schools propose reporting student achievement on learning targets and not converting this information into a letter grade
  • Nine components of a standards-based learning system presented at all Elementary schools

2012-2013:

  • The TeacherVue electronic grade book is used at Whitford and Cedar Park Middle Schools and Health & Science High School
  • Community forums continue
  • All middle school teachers continue moderating student collections of evidence around learning targets
  • Elementary teachers begin to identify targets, rubrics and assessments to align with new Common Core State Standards
  • Elementary teachers moderate writing collections of evidence across schools and calibrate individual samples

2013-2014:

  • All middle schools and Health & Science High School use the TeacherVue electronic grade book
  • Community forums continue
  • High school teachers volunteer to use TeacherVue as a standards-based reporting grade book
  • High schools agree to a three-year plan for full implementation of standards-based practices in all classes
  • Elementary schools begin using a standards-based report card
  • Elementary teachers complete learning targets and rubrics for all subject areas
  • Elementary teachers collaborate across schools to align math instruction with new targets and practices
  • All middle school teachers continue moderating student collections of evidence around learning targets

2014-15:

  • K-5 and 6-12 teacher teams continue work to refine, align and create learning targets and rubrics
  • All middle school teachers continue moderating student collections of evidence around learning targets
  • High school teachers of the following content areas use the Standards-based electronic grade book (English Language Arts, Social Studies, Math and Science) showing student progress on each courses learning targets.
  • K-5 and 6-12 teacher teams continue work to refine, align and create learning targets and rubrics
  • All middle school teachers continue moderating student collections of evidence around learning targets
  • All high school teachers, with the exception of Dual Credit, AP and IB courses, use the Standards-based electronic grade book
  • High schools begin to use a standards-based report card

2015-16:

  • K-5 and 6-12 teacher teams continue work to refine, align and create learning targets and rubrics
  • All middle school teachers continue moderating student collections of evidence around learning targets
  • All high school teachers, with the exception of Dual Credit, AP and IB courses, use the Standards-based electronic grade book
  • High schools begin to use a standards-based report card

 2016-17:

  • K-5 and 6-12 teacher teams continue work to refine, align and create learning targets and rubrics
  • All middle school teachers continue moderating student collections of evidence around learning targets
  • All high school teachers, with the exception of Dual Credit courses, use the Standards-based electronic grade book

 2017- Present:

  • K-5 and 6-12 teacher teams continue work to refine, align and create learning targets and rubrics
  • All middle school teachers continue moderating student collections of evidence around learning targets
  • All middle schools request to not convert the summary judgments to a letter grade on report cards
  • All high school teachers use the Standards-based electronic grade book

SBLS FAQs

Standards Based Learning System (SBLS) FAQs

What is standards-based learning?

Standards-based learning is a series of instructional, assessment and reporting practices built around standards. Well defined standards identify specific knowledge and skills a student should master in each subject area at each grade level. They should describe what a student should know and be able to do as a result of instruction and experiences in school. Proficiency levels describe how well a student is advancing towards meeting the standard. If a student is proficient for a standard they have met all the criteria for that standard.  (see the "Why standards-based learning?" page on this website.)

Why is the BSD implementing a standards-based learning system (SBLS), including changing report cards?
In an effort to support the district's goal of ensuring that all students graduate college and career ready, a standards-based learning system is being implemented across the district. A standards-based learning system teaches and assesses student learning based on common learning targets. The learning targets are part of a K-12 learning progression of learning leading to college and career readiness. The goal of a standards-based system is to provide clear, effective feedback about student learning. Our goal is for marks used on our reports to support and promote learning, so we must be sure they provide information about student achievement toward the learning targets that have been assessed.
 
How does a standards-based learning system impact special student populations (Special Education Students, English Language Learners, Talented and Gifted Students)?
  • English Language Learners
    • We have seen evidence that more ELLs are engaged and motivated in classrooms where standards-based learning is a focus. Because teachers are targeting instruction, they are able to diagnose exactly what students have learned and what they still need to learn while using a variety of strategies to ensure learning of concepts. With the constant feedback, practice, and opportunities to demonstrate their understanding in a variety of ways, students are engaged in their own learning. This helps them persevere in a system that can be challenging to navigate, resulting in greater student success.
  • Talented and Gifted 
    • Within a standards-based classroom, gifted and talented students who show early mastery of fundamental skills and concepts can move forward with their learning, engaging with the curriculum at a higher level and focusing on deeper, more challenging coursework. 
  • Special Education Students
    • A standards based learning system ensures that all students, regardless of ability or disability, have the opportunity to work in some way towards learning targets. For most students receiving Special Education support, only minor accommodations are needed within the general classroom setting in order for the students to achieve success and make progress toward targets. A standards based learning system allows all students, including those with individual education plans, to be assessed on what they know and can produce.
How do I see the learning targets and rubrics being used by my student's teacher?
  • Use the "Learning Target" or "Scoring Guides / Rubrics" links within this website.  You can select the subject area and then the grade level along the left-hand side of the Learning Target / Rubric page.  You can then expand each learning target to see the rubric and Supporting Learning Targets (details within each Learning Target)
If a teacher offers multiple opportunities, won't kids stop trying the first time?
  • Multiple opportunities allow students to show their growth and/or consistency on each learning target.  They also provide the teacher with sufficient evidence to determine the student's current level of proficiency.  That said, teachers may choose to determine the number of opportunities they will provide and communicate this early on in the course.  Teachers can also establish the number of pieces of evidence (opportunities completed) that will be required to have sufficient evidence to determine the student's current level of proficiency. In addition, a teacher determines the number of opportunities needed to discern an individual student's level of proficiency.
Does a teacher have to give retakes?
  • Retaking an assessment is one of many ways to provide multiple opportunities.  Other solutions include building an instructional plan that has multiple tasks addressing each learning target, having students produce predetermined additional evidence, or observation of/conversation with the student.
Isn't the work of creating district learning targets and rubrics already finished?
  • The work of developing BSD learning targets and rubrics ranges from some in their third year of revision to some that have yet to be created.  Regardless, we will continue to refine targets and rubrics based on teacher feedback.
Isn't it harder to earn an A in a standards-based system?
  • Many of our students have historically demonstrated a high level of achievement and this will continue regardless of how it is reported.  In a standards-based system, rubrics describe Highly Proficient achievement in terms of consistency, precision, application, and independence.  The same descriptors we have always used to describe the level of rigor historically required to earn an "A".   A standards-based system does require a level of proficiency across all of the major concepts and skills taught.  The intent of a standards-based classroom is to encourage student success with all instruction, assessment, and reporting tied to clearly defined learning targets.  If we make a deliberate effort to base grades on proficiency levels within the stated learning targets and the result is a shift in the distribution of grades, we should have a larger discussion around what the letter grade has been communicating and what we want it to communicate.
Doesn't the electronic grade book assign the students' grades?
  • The electronic grade book uses established criteria to consider all evidence around each learning target to make a letter grade recommendation to the teacher. Teachers will ensure the letter grade accurately represents each student's demonstrated learning and change it if necessary.

Grading and Reporting

​A effective standards-based learning system will bring significant improvements in four areas.

  1. ​Standards-based learning shifts a classroom toward one focused on growth.
  2. Standards-based learning creates greater clarity for students, teachers and parents.
  3. Standards- based learning establishes a higher level of consistency.
  4. Standards-based learning requires we tell the truth about student learning.
Reporting student achievement in a standards-based learning system is built around points 3 and 4 above.  There are several practices within a standards-based learning system that help achieve greater consistency and truth.

The learning targets are consistent across the District.

The scoring guide/rubric used for each learning target is consistent across the District.

Academic achievement and behaviors are reported separately, allowing both to be more accurate.

At grade levels where student achievement on the learning targets must be converted into a single letter grade, common conversion criteria are used.
 

Scoring Guides / Rubrics

Scoring Guides/Rubrics

The terms "Scoring Guide" and "Rubric" can be used interchangeably.  A Scoring Guide / Rubric is a document that describes student performance around a particular skill or area of knowledge.  The descriptions within a scoring guide should not only differentiate the levels of performance, it should clearly identify what success looks like.  An effective scoring guide, when used to evaluate student work, should answer three basic questions:

  • Where am I going?
  • Where am I now?
  • What must I do to close the gap?

Within Beaverton School District's Standards-Based Learning System, each Academic Learning Target has a rubric describing four levels of performance.

            4 – Highly Proficient

            3 – Proficient

            2 – Nearly Proficient

            1 – Developing

Within the Beaverton School District, we use rubrics with the four levels of performance listed above, unless a specific school program is better supported by a different type of rubric.  The International Baccalaureate's Middle Years Program at several of our middle schools is a good example.  Within these programs, rubrics with eight levels are used to better align with the program.

At the schools implementing The Middle Years Program (MYP) a 1-8 scale is used.

          7-8 - Highly Proficient

          5-6 - Proficient 

          3-4 - Nearly Proficient 

          1-2 - Developing 

Behavior long-term learning targets are assessed and reported using a rubric with three levels of performance.

            Grades K – 5                          Grades 6 – 12

            C – Consistently                    C / I – Consistently / Independently

            G – Generally                        G – Generally

            R – Rarely / Sometimes         R – Rarely / Sometimes

Behaviors are intentionally reported using a different scale to reinforce the idea that though we recognize their influence on a student's academic performance, they are different and should be reported separately.

Grading Process

How does a teacher determine a student's proficiency level and a grade?

Clear, consistent and truthful reporting of student progress begins with the learning targets.  A teacher's instruction, a student's work and the way we report a student's progress should all be focused on the learning targets.

Each teacher will ensure their instruction and student tasks are aligned to the Learning Targets.  At the end of a reporting period, the teacher will consider all of the evidence a student produced around each Learning Target and use the Scoring Guide/Rubric associated with that Learning Target to determine the student's proficiency level.

Teachers use the conversion criteria to guide converting their learning target proficiency judgments into a letter grade.
 
Summary Judgment to Letter Grade Conversion Criteria 

MYP Summary Judgment to Letter Grade Conversion Criteria

Cedar Park, Meadow Park, ISB and Mountainside have implemented the International Baccalaureate's Middle Years Program (MYP) and use the MYP 1-8 scale.

EXAMPLE of grade determination

            Three Learning Targets are reported on in a writing class.

The teacher gathers evidence for each of the Learning Targets and using a Scoring Guide/Rubric to assign a proficiency score for each piece of student work.

Sample Learning Target and Scoring Guide/Rubric

Writing Academic Learning Target 1 (ALT 1):  I can write an argumentative piece using evidence

 ALT 1 Rubric:

4  Highly Proficient

  • I independently formulate, support and communicate a clear, thought-provoking thesis statement/claim in my introduction.
  • I organize reasons and apply evidence in support of my claim and develop thorough arguments that run counter to my own, acknowledging strengths and limitations.
  • I consistently use a variety of fluid transitions between ideas.
  • I develop a conclusion that connects back to the claim and includes relevant insight.

Proficient

  • I independently formulate, support and communicate a clear thesis statement/claim in my introduction.
  • I organize reasons and apply evidence in support of my claim and develop thorough arguments that run counter to my own, attempting to acknowledge strengths and limitations.
  • I consistently use appropriate transitions that connect ideas and evidence.
  • I develop a conclusion that connects back to the claim and attempts to offer thought-provoking insight.

2  Nearly Proficient

  • I articulate a position by writing and defending a clear thesis statement/claim in my introduction, which may be in response to a prompt.
  • I attempt to organize reasons and apply evidence in support of my claim. I can acknowledge arguments that run counter to my own.
  • I use transitions that connect ideas and evidence.
  • I provide a conclusion that connects back to the claim and ideas.

1  Developing

  • I struggle with fully articulating a position or defending a thesis statement/claim in my introduction.
  • I have difficulty organizing my reasons and/or providing enough evidence to support my claim. I may not acknowledge arguments that run counter to my own.
  • I inconsistently use transitions.
  • I attempt to develop a conclusion that summarizes the claim and ideas, but it may not be clear.

The proficiency scores of each the three  Learning Targets are averaged to determine overall performance

  • Target #1 Overall Performance:  4
  • Target #2 Overall Performance:  2
  • Target #3 Overall Performance:  3
  • Average of Learning Target Scores:  3.0
The average is converted to a letter grade
  • Final Letter Grade:  B
Conversion to Letter Grade
            A:  3.4 – 4
            B:  2.7 – 3.4
            C:  2.0 – 2.7
            D:  1.6 – 2.0
            F:  Less than 1.6

Student Progress / Report Card Information

BSD Progress / Report Card Explanations and Schedule

Elementary

BSD Student Reporting Communication Dates 2019-20 - Elementary

November 1, 2019
Teachers engage in assessment activities as determined by each site staff.  Appropriate activities are scoring, inputting scores, collecting, scoring and recording work samples, or communicating with parents about assessment.
 
January 27, 2019
Centrally generated Progress Reports with Summary Judgments on each Learning Target addressed and Special Education Progress Notes, indicating current progress after Semester 1, based on data recorded by January 24, 2020.
 
April 10, 2020
Centrally generated Progress Reports with Summary Judgments on each Learning Target addressed and Special Education Progress Notes, indicating current progress, based on data recorded by April 9, 2020
 
June 15, 2020
Centrally generated Progress Reports with Summary Judgments on each Learning Target addressed, Letter Grades and Special Education Progress Notes, indicating current progress after Semester 2, based on data recorded by June 12, 2020.
 

Elementary Report Card Explanation

 
The Beaverton Report Card has been developed to share information with parents, families, and students regarding the “end of year” expectations and targets in the academic areas of Reading, Speaking/Listening, Writing, Language, Mathematics, Music, and Physical Education.
 
Science, Health, Social Studies, and Visual Arts are based on the targets that were taught during that semester. They are not based on end-of-the-year targets. 
 
When thinking about proficiency grading, imagine a student hiking to the top of a mountain that represents an end of year target. At the mid-way point through the school year, teachers will be sharing information with you about the distance they have travelled toward the mountaintop (or the target), as well as the rate at which they are progressing.  
 
Academic Key
The academic mark reflects proficiency in the areas of Reading, Writing, Language, Speaking/Listening, Math, Music, and PE in relationship to the end of year target. Consider this number the proximity to or distance from the end of year target. 
 
Academic Mark of 4  -  Highly Proficient:  In addition to being proficient, working consistently at an in depth and complex level within, or beyond, the end grade level expectations for the current grade level
 
Academic Mark of 3  -  Proficient:  Meeting end of the year expectations for the current grade level
 
Academic Mark of 2  -   Nearly Proficient:  Nearly meeting end of grade level expectations for the current grade level
           
Academic Mark of 1  -  Working Toward/Developing Proficiency:  Far from meeting end of grade level   expectations for the current grade level. Please pay particular attention to the Semester Progress Indicators as well as teacher comments
 
Semester Progress Indicators
The Semester Progress Indicator reflects the rate of progress at which a student is traveling toward the target. These measures are noted as symbols on the Report Card.
 
Progress indicator of  +    Significant Progress:  Making significant progress toward the end of the year target.
Progress indicator of   =   Steady Progress:  Making steady progress that would lead to proficiency by the end of the year.
Progress indicator of   -     Minimal Progress:  Not making adequate progress.
Behavior Key
Behavior marks reflect your child’s performance for this term, not end of year expectations.
 
C        Consistently  
G        Generally
R        Rarely/Sometimes (Needs Improvement)
 
Behavior Learning Targets:
 
Manages responsibilities as a student
●      Uses class time appropriately
●      Prepares for class with necessary materials and is ready to learn.
●      Follows directions timely and accurately
●      Demonstrates quality work
●      Makes safe and appropriate choices
 
Self-directs learning
●      Develops a plan to achieve goals, with teacher support
●      Persists with a task over time
●      Utilizes a variety of sources to find help
●      Advocates for self
 
Communicates and works effectively within a team or group
●      Actively participates in group work.
●      Listens respectfully and acknowledges the contributions of others
●      Shares ideas clearly
●      Contributes to creating a safe learning environment
●      Adapts to changes in the group process with a positive attitude
 
Engages with technology in a safe and responsible manner.
●      Practices responsible care and use of technology
●      Demonstrates safety online, and follows guidelines when using the internet and while collaborating with others
●      Recognizes ownership of information, and how to respect the work of others
●      Keeps information private and respects the privacy of others
 

Middle School

BSD Student Reporting Communication Dates 2019-20 - Middle School

November 1, 2019
Centrally generated Progress Reports with Summary Judgments on each Learning Target addressed and Special Education Progress Notes, indicating current progress, based on data recorded by October 31, 2019.
 
January 27, 2019
Centrally generated Progress Reports with Summary Judgments on each Learning Target addressed, Letter Grades and Special Education Progress Notes, indicating current progress after Semester 1, based on data recorded by January 24, 2020.
 
April 10, 2020
Teachers engage in assessment activities as determined by each site staff.  Appropriate activities are scoring, inputting scores, collecting, scoring and recording work samples, or communicating with parents about assessment.
 
June 15, 2020
Centrally generated Progress Reports with Summary Judgments on each Learning Target addressed and Special Education Progress Notes, indicating current progress after Semester 1, based on data recorded by June 12, 2020.
 

Middle school Report Card Explanation

Middle School End-of-the-Year Report Card
The Middle School report card incorporates the Common Core State Standards and Oregon State Standards. It provides information on your child’s progress in key areas within each subject, as well as academic behaviors.
Each column represents a grading period and, with each additional column, shows growth over time.
 
Academic Learning Targets
Each subject area lists the Academic Learning Targets aligned to the Common Core and/or Oregon State Standards.  The teacher provides feedback on students’ progress with a Summary Judgment and may include comments.  Academic Learning Targets are part of a year-long plan for a course and many students may still be Developing or Nearing Proficient early in the learning of the new targets.  All students need to be proficient by the end of the year to be fully prepared for the next grade level. 

Note:  an * means that this target was not assessed during the grading period.

Summary Judgments represent a collection of evidence (assignments and assessments) on each Academic Learning Target.  All middle schools, except MYP schools (Cedar Park and Meadow Park), use a 1-4 scale for Summary Judgments.  MYP schools use a 1-8 scale for Summary Judgments.

For more information, please contact your school.

Behavior Learning Targets 

 The Behavior Progress section allows the teacher to provide feedback on your child’s progress in the Behavior Learning Targets. These are the skills necessary for your child to be a successful learner.

Academic MarkLetter grades may or may not appear depending on the school and grading period.   Many middle schools show grades at the end of each semester.

Current Progress Indicator
Each subject area could include its own progress measure that indicates whether the student is learning at a:
  • Significant (+)
  • Steady (=)
  • Minimal (-) rate

High School

BSD Student Reporting Communication Dates 2019-20 - high school

November 1, 2019
Centrally generated Progress Reports with Summary Judgments on each Learning Target addressed, Letter Grades and Special Education Progress Notes, indicating current progress, based on data recorded by October 31, 2019.
 
January 27, 2019
Centrally generated Progress Reports with Summary Judgments on each Learning Target addressed, Letter Grades and Special Education Progress Notes, indicating current progress after Semester 1, based on data recorded by January 24, 2020, and to be posted to the student’s transcript
 
April 10, 2020
Centrally generated Progress Reports with Summary Judgments on each Learning Target addressed, Letter Grades and Special Education Progress Notes, indicating current progress, based on data recorded by April 9, 2020.
 
June 15, 2020
Centrally generated Progress Reports with Summary Judgments on each Learning Target addressed, Letter Grades and Special Education Progress Notes, indicating current progress after Semester 2, based on data recorded by June 12, 2020, and to be posted to the student’s transcript.
 

high school Report Card Explanation

The High School report card incorporates the Common Core State Standards and Oregon State Standards. It provides information on your child’s progress in key areas within each subject, as well as academic behaviors.
Each column represents a grading period and, with each additional column, shows growth over time.
 
Academic Learning Targets
Each subject area lists the Academic Learning Targets aligned to the Common Core and/or Oregon State Standards.  The teacher provides feedback on students’ progress with a Summary Judgment and may include comments.  Academic Learning Targets are part of a year-long plan for a course and many students may still be Developing or Nearing Proficient early in the learning of the new targets.  All students need to be proficient by the end of the year to be fully prepared for the next grade level. 
Note:  an * means that this target was not assessed during the grading period.
 
Summary Judgments represent a collection of evidence (assignments and assessments) on each Academic Learning Target.  All high schools, except MYP schools (ISB and Mountainside), use a 1-4 scale for Summary Judgments.  MYP schools use a 1-8 scale for Summary Judgments.
 
For more information, please contact your school.
 
Behavior Learning Targets
The Behavior Progress section allows the teacher to provide feedback on your child’s progress in the Behavior Learning Targets. These are the skills necessary for your child to be a successful learner.
 
Academic Mark
Letter grades may or may not appear depending on the school and grading period.   Many middle schools show grades at the end of each semester.
 
Current Progress Indicator
Each subject area could include its own progress measure that indicates the student’s rate of learning:
  • Significant (+)
  • Steady (=)
  • Minimal (-)
 

Online Report Access

Credit by Proficiency

Coming Soon