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English Language Learners

Oregon English Language Learner Report

Oregon English Language Learner Report​​ (Use this link to download the report from Oregon Department of Education.)
The most recent report is for the 2017-2018 School Year.

The Oregon English Language Learner Report is an annual publication required by law (ORS 327.016), which reports on financial information for English language learner programs, the objectives and needs of students eligible for and enrolled in an English language learner program, as well as provides information on the demographics of students in English language learner programs in each school district. In addition, this report provides a tool that makes data on English language learners accessible to researchers, media, students, and parents. ​

English Language Learner Program Guide

The English Language Learner Program Guide is located on the Oregon Department of Education website at  This is a living document and subject to frequent updates. We recommend reviewing the document online rather than printing a hard copy. This document includes information from the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, it is subject to change when additional guidance is received from the US Department of Education.

Identification of ELs

BSD will follow the statewide identification procedure for all English Learners (EL) that was approved by ODE. The Language Use Survey (LUS) will be completed for all students on the enrollment form upon entry to Beaverton School District. If a language other than English is listed on the LUS, the MLD will proceed to investigate the student’s status as an English Language Learner.

The EL secretary will verify a student’s EL eligibility, ineligibility, proficiency, or need to be assessed through investigation:

  • If the student was previously enrolled in an Oregon School District
    • the secretary will refer to the ODE EL History Report or contact the previous school district to obtain
      • most recent ELPA Screener assessment scores or
      • most recent ELPA Summative assessment scores
  • If the student is enrolling for the first time in a public Oregon school and is coming from another ELPA state: Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Nebraska, Ohio, South Carolina, Washington, or West Virginia
    • ELPA Screener or Summative scores will be accepted if provided by parents 
    • If scores are:
      • not available; student will be administered the ELPA Screener
      • over one year old; student will be administered the ELPA Screener
  • If the student is enrolling for the first time in a public Oregon school and is NOT coming from another ELPA state the student will be administered the ELPA Screener.

Program Models

Co-Teaching/Push-In

ELD instruction is provided within the student’s mainstream or content-area classroom

Pull-Out

ELLs spend a part of the day in a mainstream classroom, and are “pulled out” for a portion of the day to receive ELD instruction. This approach is more common in elementary school settings.

ELD Class Period

ELLs receive their ELD instruction during a regular class period and also receive course credit for the class. This approach is more common in middle schools and high schools.

Sheltered Instruction

Teachers use instructional strategies to deliver grade level subject matter, such as Mathematics, English Language Arts, Science & Social Studies, in order to make content accessible

Exiting

Beaverton School District uses ELPA Summative results to determine when an EL is Proficient. Any EL who scores any combination of 4s and 5s in their Reading, Writing, Listening, and Speaking language domains (or in the domains assessed as per IEP in the case of ELSWD) is considered proficient and will be exited and monitored for four years. 

Monitoring

The purpose of the EL Monitoring Process is to help determine if ELD services should be reinstated for a student who previously exited the ELD program.  According to the Oregon Department of Education:

A student is monitored for four years from the date the student is exited from the ELD program.  Monitoring consists of reviewing student academic progress in class(es). Teacher observations, work samples, grades, and state assessment data may be reviewed as part of monitoring.  If a student is struggling academically due to academic language, it is possible for the student to be re-entered into the ELD program. This type of determination is made by a team of educators, who review evidence of the student’s academic English.  The team should consider if the student is in need of assistance due to academic language needs, or if the student could benefit from core instruction interventions prior to re-entered the student in the EL program.

English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA)

What is ELPA?

The ELPA21 assessment system measures a student’s proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, listening to, and understanding English. It comprises two assessments: the screener assessment and the summative assessment.

ELPA21’s screener assessment is used to identify students who may qualify as English language learners (ELLs). It is given either at the beginning of the school year or at the time a student arrives at a new school system. Students who qualify as ELLs as a result of the ELPA21 screener assessment are placed into their school’s ELL program and receive supplemental English learning support throughout the school year.

At the end of each school year, all designated ELLs are required to take the ELPA21 summative assessment. Results from that assessment are used to determine whether a student still qualifies as an English language learner or whether a student has achieved a sufficient level of proficiency in English so that he or she no longer needs support and can exit the school’s ELL program.

The ELPA21 assessment is different from standard classroom tests. Instead of measuring a student’s knowledge of academic content, ELPA21 measures a student’s ability to understand and communicate in English. Performance on the ELPA21 screener and summative assessments will not affect your student’s grades, your student’s subject-based test scores, or your school’s overall state performance rating. Results from the ELPA21 assessment are used to determine whether a student qualifies for English support services and what types of services might be needed.

Why use ELPA?

Your student’s school adopted new ELP Standards that emphasize the important connection between learning English and understanding classroom content. The ELPA21 assessments are aligned with these high-quality standards and are designed to be more engaging and interactive for students. The tests are computer-based and include questions and prompts that mimic classroom interactions that students are familiar with, such as student presentations, hallway conversations, and debates.

Preparing for ELPA

How can I help my student get ready?

You are an important partner in your student’s education. Here are some things you can do to help prepare him or her for ELPA21:

  • Speak to your student’s teacher about which areas of English your student needs to focus on improving.
  • Set aside time every day to have your student read his or her favorite books to you.

ELPA Proficiency Descriptors

Emerging

ELPA21 Official: Students are Emerging when they have not yet attained a level of English language skill necessary to produce, interpret, and collaborate on grade-level content‐related academic tasks in English. This is indicated on ELPA21 by attaining a profile of Levels 1 and 2 in all four domains. Students scoring Emerging on ELPA21 are eligible for ongoing program support. 

Oregon “family friendly” version: Emerging – A student at the Emerging level does not yet have the ability produce grade-level academic content in the English language. For the ELPA21 annual assessment, this means the student scores either Level 1 or Level 2 in each of the four domains of reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

Progressing

ELPA21 Official: Students are Progressing when, with support, they approach a level of English language skill necessary to produce, interpret, and collaborate, on grade-level content‐related academic tasks in English. This is indicated on ELPA21 by attaining a profile with one or more domain scores above Level 2 that does not meet the requirements to be Proficient. Students scoring Progressing on ELPA21 are eligible for ongoing program support.

Oregon “family friendly” version: Progressing – A student at the Progressing level is approaching the ability produce grade-level academic content in the English language with support. For the ELPA21 annual assessment, this means the student scores above a Level 2 on one or more domains, but does not yet meet the requirements to be at the Proficient level on the four domains of reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

Proficient

ELPA21 Official: Students are Proficient when they attain a level of English language skill necessary to independently produce, interpret, collaborate on, and succeed in grade-level content‐related academic tasks in English. This is indicated on ELPA21 by attaining a profile of Level 4 or higher in all domains. Once Proficient on ELPA21, students can be considered for reclassification.

Oregon “family friendly” version: Proficient – A student at the Proficient level can produce grade-level academic content in the English language. For the ELPA21 annual assessment, this means the student scores either Level 4 or Level 5 on each of the four domains of reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

ELPA Performance Standards (Cut Scores)

ELPA Achievement Level Descriptors