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FLEX Online Course Catalog

Flex offers the following credit bearing courses and academic support tutorials.

If you don't see what you need on the list, please contact our FLEX counselor at BSD-Flex-Online@beaverton.k12.or.us

Credit Bearing Courses

Flex currently has teachers for Math, ELA, Social Studies and Health.  Additional teachers are also available at each of our sites.

Health Courses

We are currently working on our offerings in this subject for the 2019/20 school year.

Language Arts Courses

BSD Courses: L2111 Reading Lab, L225 Read/Write Lab, L400 Writing Lab

Language Arts Laboratory courses provide instruction in basic language skills, integrating reading, writing, speaking, and listening, while placing great emphasis on the progress of individual students. Course content depends upon students’ abilities and may include vocabulary building, improving spelling and grammar, developing writing and composition skills, reading silently or aloud, and improving listening and comprehension abilities.

BSD Course: L401 Creative Writing 1

Creative Writing courses offer students the opportunity to develop and improve their technique and individual style in poetry, short story, drama, essays, and other forms of prose. The emphasis of the courses is on writing; however, students may study exemplary representations and authors to obtain a fuller appreciation of the form and craft. Although most creative writing classes cover several expressive forms, others concentrate exclusively on one particular form (such as poetry or playwriting).

BSD Course: L507 Media As Lit

English/Literature (juniors and seniors) courses are designed for juniors and/or seniors and emphasize comprehension, discernment, and critical-thinking skills in the reading of texts and literature. These courses introduce and explore more advanced literary techniques (irony, satire, humor, connotation, tone, rhythm, symbolism, and so on) through two or more literary genres, with the aim of creating sophisticated readers. Writing assignments are required as an additional method to develop and improve critical-thinking and analytic skills.

BSD Course: L510 American Lit

American Literature courses focus upon commonly known American authors and their work. Students improve their critical-thinking skills as they determine the underlying assumptions and values within the selected works and as they understand how the literature reflects the society of the time. Oral discussion is an integral part of literature courses, and written compositions are often required.

BSD Courses: L601 Lit and Comp I, L605 Lit and comp 9

English/Language Arts I (9th grade) courses build upon students’ prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and the mechanics of writing and usually include the four aspects of language use: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Typically, these courses introduce and define various genres of literature, with writing exercises often linked to reading selections.

BSD Courses: L602 Lit and Comp II, L610 Lit and comp 10

English/Language Arts II (10th grade) courses usually offer a balanced focus on composition and literature. Typically, students learn about the alternate aims and audiences of written compositions by writing persuasive, critical, and creative multi-paragraph essays and compositions. Through the study of various genres of literature, students can improve their reading rate and comprehension and develop the skills to determine the author’s intent and theme and to recognize the techniques used by the author to deliver his or her message.

BSD Course: L615 Lit and Comp 11

English/Language Arts III (11th grade) courses continue to develop students’ writing skills, emphasizing clear, logical writing patterns, word choice, and usage, as students write essays and begin to learn the techniques of writing research papers. Students continue to read works of literature, which often form the backbone of the writing assignments. Literary conventions and stylistic devices may receive greater emphasis than in previous courses.

BSD Course: L617 Lit and Comp 12

English/Language Arts IV (12th grade) courses blend composition and literature into a cohesive whole as students write critical and comparative analyses of selected literature, continuing to develop their language arts skills. Typically, students primarily write multi-paragraph essays, but they may also write one or more major research papers.

BSD Course: L620 Amer Lit/Com

English/Composition (juniors and seniors) courses are designed for juniors and/or seniors and build upon previous writing skills. Reinforcing the logic and critical-thinking skills that accompany good writing, these courses—which emphasize word choice, usage, and writing mechanics—provide continued and advanced instruction in writing for a variety of purposes and audiences. English/Composition (juniors and seniors) courses may emphasize college or business preparation; literature study may be offered as an additional component in which students analyze examples of several genres.

BSD Course: L810 AP English Language

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level English courses, AP English Language and Composition courses expose students to prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. These courses emphasize the interaction of authorial purpose, intended audience, and the subject at hand, and through them, students learn to develop stylistic flexibility as they write compositions covering a variety of subjects that are intended for various purposes.

BSD Course: L820 AP English Lit

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level English courses, AP English Literature and Composition courses enable students to develop critical standards for evaluating literature. Students study the language, character, action, and theme in works of recognized literary merit; enrich their understanding of connotation, metaphor, irony, syntax, and tone; and write compositions of their own (including literary analysis, exposition, argument, narrative, and creative writing).

 

Math Courses

BSD Course M360 - Geometry

Geometry courses, emphasizing an abstract, formal approach to the study of geometry, typically include topics such as properties of plane and solid figures; deductive methods of reasoning and use of logic; geometry as an axiomatic system including the study of postulates, theorems, and formal proofs; concepts of congruence, similarity, parallelism, perpendicularity, and proportion; and rules of angle measurement in triangles.

BSD Course: M381 Alg/Geo/Stats I

Integrated Mathematics I courses emphasize proficiency in skills involving numbers and operations, algebra, geometry, statistics, and probability. These courses are offered as the first course in a 3- or 4-year sequence of college-preparatory mathematics courses that replace traditional Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 courses.

BSD Course: M382 Alg/Geo/Stats II

Integrated Mathematics II courses emphasize proficiency in skills involving numbers and operations, algebra, geometry, statistics, and probability. These courses are offered as the second course in a 3- or 4-year sequence of college-preparatory mathematics courses that replace traditional Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 courses.

BSD course: M383 Alg/Geo/Stats III

Integrated Mathematics III courses emphasize proficiency in skills involving numbers and operations, algebra, geometry, statistics, and probability. These courses are offered as the third course in a 3- or 4-year sequence of college-preparatory mathematics courses that replace traditional Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2 courses.

bsd course: M420 Prob Stats Analysis

Probability and Statistics courses introduce the study of likely events and the analysis, interpretation, and presentation of quantitative data. Course topics generally include basic probability and statistics: discrete probability theory, odds and probabilities, probability trees, populations and samples, frequency tables, measures of central tendency, and presentation of data (including graphs). Course topics may also include normal distribution and measures of variability.

bsd course: M505 Algebra II

Algebra II course topics typically include field properties and theorems; set theory; operations with rational and irrational expressions; factoring of rational expressions; in-depth study of linear equations and inequalities; quadratic equations; solving systems of linear and quadratic equations; graphing of constant, linear, and quadratic equations; properties of higher-degree equations; and operations with rational and irrational exponents.

bsd course: M520 Func Analys/Trig

Covering topics of both Trigonometry and Mathematic Analysis, these courses prepare students for eventual work in calculus. Topics typically include the study of right trigonometric and circular functions, inverses, and graphs; trigonometric identities and equations; solutions of right and oblique triangles; complex numbers; numerical tables; polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and rational functions and their graphs; vectors; set theory; Boolean algebra and symbolic logic; mathematical induction; matrix algebra; sequences and series; and limits and continuity.

bsd course: M600 Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus courses combine the study of Trigonometry, Elementary Functions, Analytic Geometry, and Mathematic Analysis topics as preparation for calculus. Topics typically include the study of complex numbers; polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, rational, right trigonometric, and circular functions, and their relations, inverses and graphs; trigonometric identities and equations; solutions of right and oblique triangles; vectors; the polar coordinate system; conic sections; Boolean algebra and symbolic logic; mathematical induction; matrix algebra; sequences and series; and limits and continuity.

bsd course: M750 AP Calculus AB

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level calculus courses, AP Calculus AB provides students with an understanding of the concepts of calculus and experience with its methods and applications. These courses introduce calculus and include the following topics: functions, graphs, limits, and continuity; differential calculus (including definition, application, and computation of the derivative; derivative at a point; derivative as a function; and second derivatives); and integral calculus (including definite integrals and antidifferentiation).

bsd course: M775 AP Statistics

Following the College Board's suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level statistics courses, AP Statistics courses introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference.

Social Studies Courses

BSD COURSES: S210 Social Study I, S220 Social Study II, S225 Social Study 9, S230 Social Study 10, S305 Global Study 9

In addition to covering the objectives of World History—Overview courses, World History and Geography courses provide an overview of world geography. These courses are often developed in response to increased national concern regarding the importance of geography, and they explore geographical concepts.

bsd courses: S306 World History 9, S311 World History 10

World History—Overview courses provide students with an overview of the history of human society from early civilization to the contemporary period, examining political, economic, social, religious, military, scientific, and cultural developments. World History—Overview courses may include geographical studies, but often these components are not as explicitly taught as geography.

bsd course: S315 World Geog/Cult

World Geography courses provide students with an overview of world geography, but may vary widely in the topics they cover. Topics typically include the physical environment; the political landscape; the relationship between people and the land; economic production and development; and the movement of people, goods, and ideas.

bsd course: S400 US History

U.S. History—Comprehensive courses provide students with an overview of the history of the United States, examining time periods from discovery or colonialism through World War II or after. These courses typically include a historical overview of political, military, scientific, and social developments. Course content may include a history of the North American peoples before European settlement.

bsd course: S410 AP US History

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. History courses, AP U.S. History courses provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to address critically problems and materials in U.S. history. Students learn to assess historical materials and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course examines the discovery and settlement of the New World through the recent past.

bsd course: S440 World History

World History—Overview courses provide students with an overview of the history of human society from early civilization to the contemporary period, examining political, economic, social, religious, military, scientific, and cultural developments. World History—Overview courses may include geographical studies, but often these components are not as explicitly taught as geography.

BSD course: S444 AP World History

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level World History courses, AP World History courses examine world history from 8000 BCE to the present with the aim of helping students develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contracts and how different human societies have interacted. These courses highlight the nature of changes in an international context and explore their causes and continuity.

bsd course: S516 AP Comparative Government

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level Comparative Government and Politics courses, these courses offer students an understanding of the world’s diverse political structures and practices. The courses encompass the study of both specific countries and general concepts used to interpret the key political relationships found in virtually all national policies. Course content generally includes sovereignty, authority, and power; political institutions; the relationships among citizens, society, and the state; political and economic change; and public policy.

bsd course: S550 US Issues (Multicultural Studies)

Contemporary U.S. Issues courses study the political, economic, and social issues facing the United States, with or without an emphasis on state and local issues. These courses may focus on current issues or may examine selected issues that span throughout the 20th century to the present.

bsd course: S602 Government and Economics

U.S. Government—Comprehensive courses provide an overview of the structure and functions of the U.S. government and political institutions and examine constitutional principles, the concepts of rights and responsibilities, the role of political parties and interest groups, and the importance of civic participation in the democratic process. These courses may examine the structure and function of state and local governments and may cover certain economic and legal topics.

bsd course: S605 Economics 1

Economics courses provide students with an overview of economics with primary emphasis on the principles of microeconomics and the U.S. economic system. These courses may also cover topics such as principles of macroeconomics, international economics, and comparative economics. Economic principles may be presented in formal theoretical contexts, applied contexts, or both.

bsd course: S621 AP MacroEcon and 622 AP MicroEcon

AP Economics courses prepare students for the College Board’s examinations in both AP Microeconomics and AP Macroeconomics. See SCED codes 04203 and 04204 for detailed content descriptions.

bsd course: S710 Psychology

Psychology courses introduce students to the study of individual human behavior. Course content typically includes (but is not limited to) an overview of the field of psychology, topics in human growth and development, personality and behavior, and abnormal psychology.

bsd course: S725 AP Psychology

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel a college-level psychology course, AP Psychology courses introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals, expose students to each major subfield within psychology, and enable students to examine the methods that psychologists use in their science and practice.

Science Courses

bsd course: C411 Biology I

Biology courses are designed to provide information regarding the fundamental concepts of life and life processes. These courses include (but are not restricted to) such topics as cell structure and function, general plant and animal physiology, genetics, and taxonomy.

BSD COURSE: C490 AP Biology

Adhering to the curricula recommended by the College Board and designed to parallel college-level introductory biology courses, AP Biology courses emphasize four general concepts: evolution; cellular processes (energy and communication); genetics and information transfer; and interactions of biological systems. For each concept, these courses emphasize the development of scientific inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. AP Biology courses include college-level laboratory investigations.

BSD COURSE: C511 Chemistry I

Chemistry courses involve studying the composition, properties, and reactions of substances. These courses typically explore such concepts as the behaviors of solids, liquids, and gases; acid/base and oxidation/reduction reactions; and atomic structure. Chemical formulas and equations and nuclear reactions are also studied.

BSD COURSE: C590 AP Chemistry

Following the curricula recommended by the College Board, AP Chemistry courses usually follow high school chemistry and second-year algebra. Concepts covered may include the structure of matter; bonding of intermolecular forces; chemical reactions; kinetics; thermodynamics; and chemical equilibrium. For each concept, these courses emphasize the development of scientific inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. AP Chemistry courses include college-level laboratory investigations.

BSD COURSE: C611 Physics I

Physics courses involve the study of the forces and laws of nature affecting matter, such as equilibrium, motion, momentum, and the relationships between matter and energy. The study of physics includes examination of sound, light, and magnetic and electric phenomena.

BSD COURSE: C693 AP PHYSICS

Designed by the College Board to parallel first-semester college-level courses in algebra-based physics, AP Physics 1 courses focus on Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory circuits. These courses may also include college-level laboratory investigations.

BSD COURSE: C790 AP EnvironMENTAL Science

AP Environmental Science courses are designed by the College Board to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, identify and analyze environmental problems (both natural and human made), evaluate the relative risks associated with the problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Topics covered include science as a process, ecological processes and energy conversions, earth as an interconnected system, the impact of humans on natural systems, cultural and societal contexts of environmental problems, and the development of practices that will ensure sustainable systems.

World Language Courses

BSD Course: W201 Spanish I

Designed to introduce students to Spanish language and culture, Spanish I courses prepare students to communicate authentically in Spanish by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on a variety of topics. They introduce the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Spanish-speaking cultures.

BSD Course: W202 Spanish II

Spanish II courses build upon skills developed in Spanish I, preparing students to communicate authentically in Spanish by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on concrete topics. Spanish II courses introduce the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Spanish-speaking cultures.

BSD Course: W203 Spanish III

Spanish III courses prepare students to communicate authentically in Spanish by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics, including connections to other subject areas. These courses expand students’ knowledge of relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Spanish-speaking countries and cultures.

BSD Course: W206 AP Spanish

Designed by the College Board to parallel third-year college-level courses in Spanish language, AP Spanish Language and Culture courses build upon prior knowledge and develop students’ ability to express ideas, exchange opinions, and present information in Spanish, both orally and in writing. These courses also help students understand and interpret written and spoken Spanish. In addition, students explore the culture of Spanish-speaking people in historical and contemporary contexts.

BSD Course: W301 French I

Designed to introduce students to French language and culture, French I courses prepare students to communicate authentically in French by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on a variety of topics. They introduce the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of French-speaking cultures.

BSD Course: W302 French II

French II courses build upon skills developed in French I, preparing students to communicate authentically in French by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on concrete topics. French II courses introduce the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of French-speaking cultures.

Tutorials

What are Apex Tutorials?

Tutorials offer a flexible, engaging curriculum for exam preparation, intervention, remediation, and initial instruction. Tutorials have interactive lessons, videos, and assessments. Teacher access is free and available anytime. Contact BSD Flex Online if you're interested in using them with your classes.

What does a Tutorial Look Like?

The common core tutorials are a series of short lessons, tutorials, assessments, and videos. They are arranged into units and modules. A sample module window is below.

graphic describing apex tutorials

Which Subjects are Available?

Math Tutorials

Middle School Math

Math 6, Math 7, Math 8

high school math

AGS 1, AGS 2, AGS 3, Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry

Language Arts Tutorials

middle school language arts

English 6, English 7, English 8

high school language arts

English 9, English 10, English 11, English 12

Science Tutorials

Middle School Science

Science 6, Science 7, Science 8, MS Earth and and Space Science, MS Life Science, MS Physical Science

High School Science

HS Biology

Social Studies Tutorials

middle school Social studies

MS Civics, MS US History, MS World History

high school social studies

HS US History

College Test Prep Tutorials

ACT English, ACT Reading, ACT Math

SAT Reading, SAT Writing and Language, SAT Math

GED Prep Tutorials

GED Reasoning through Language Arts

GED Mathematical Reasoning